Huizinga’s ReMA-PhD-council is looking for new members

Dear PhD and ReMA-candidates of the Huizinga Institute,

We have to announce the sad fact that two of the PhD-representatives and one ReMA-representative are leaving the council. Milou van Hout, Michel van Duijnen and Aimée Plukker will leave after years of service, to make place for the next generation of PhD and ReMA representatives. We are therefore looking for two new PhD-members and one new ReMA-member of the Huizinga ReMA-PhD-council. The council represents all Huizinga PhDs and ReMA students and forms both an official and unofficial link between the program team and the board of directors on the one hand and the PhD/ReMA community on the other. Tasks of the PhD/ReMA-representatives include, but are not restricted to: attending the program team meetings where the yearly curriculum is designed and decided upon, giving advice on future courses, evaluating given courses, conducting a yearly survey and keeping an eye on the communication between the Huizinga Institute and the PhD/ReMA-candidates.

If you are interested or have questions about the function, please drop us an e-mail (B.Th.Pierik@uva.nl), so we can inform you of the procedure. Let us know if you are interested before the 7th of February, so we can select new candidates before the 1st of March.

Best regards,

The Huizinga ReMA-PhD-council

Masterclass by Benjamin Schmidt: ‘Violent images, violence against images: the visual culture of violence in the in early modern period’ – 23 March 2019 (& 21 March Lecture)

Date:                  Masterclass: 23 March 2019 (& 21 March Lecture – time t.b.a.)

Time:                 10.00 – 12.30 h

Venue:              Brakke Grond, Vlaams Cultuurhuis
Open to:           ReMa-students and PhD candidates

Fee (non-members): n/a

Credits:             1 ECTS (available upon request)

Coordination:  Inger Leemans, Michel van Duijnen

Registration:   Maximum participants in masterclass: 15 (first come first serve base). Keynote open to all.

Register before 28 February 2019 via an email to m.f.van.duijnen@vu.nl 

 

Speaker: Benjamin Schmidt

Benjamin Schmidt is Professor of History at the University of Washington, Seattle, and author of several books, including the prize-winning Innocence Abroad: The Dutch Imagination and the New World, and the 2016 Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe’s Early Modern World.

Program: Keynote + Masterclass

Prof. Schmidt will present a keynote at the conference ‘Imagineering Violence’ on ‘fumi-e’, [‘stepping-on pictures] the symbolic iconoclasm that Europeans were forced to perform in early modern Japan. In particular, the keynote will explore the way in which such acts would have necessitated a re-performance of iconoclasm (in this case, literally stepping on icons) for Europeans in Japan.  It is clear that there were non-Dutch among the ‘Dutch’ in Deshima, including Catholics and Lutherans; yet it is also likely that Calvinists, too, would have had misgivings about the performance of iconoclasm. What were the material dimensions of such Asian-European encounters, and how did they influence this clash in attitudes over religious imagery and violence?

During the masterclass, participants will have the chance to relate their own research to the broader issue of the relationship between visuals and violence. Using the chapter on print culture and violence from Schmidt’s latest work, Inventing Exoticism, participants are invited to reflect on the ways in which early modern media grappled with the representation of violence, and how they positioned such representations in terms of geography, as well as religious and political identities.

Imagineering Violence Conference

The keynote is part of the two-day conference Imagineering Violence, which aims to analyze early modern techniques of representing violence and their transformations over time. In particular, the conference will cover the technical and performative aspects of the depiction of violence, whether in print or painting, on stage, in the anatomical theater, the scaffold, and elsewhere. What regimes of representing and staging violence can we trace? We assume that by zooming in on the concept of violence, we are forced to rethink traditional boundaries, between secular and religious realms, between East and West, between baroque and classical styles, between theatricality and spectacle, between the public and the private sphere.

Program:

  • day planning (incl. coffee and tea, and lunch breaks)

o   10.00 – 10.15   Ontvangst met koffie

o   10.15   Start Masterclass

o   12.30-13.30 Lunch at Brakke Grond

Preparation and proposed readings:

  • literature

o   General preparation: take note of the work of professor Schmidt

o   Read: Benjamin Schmidt, Inventing Exoticism, chapter 3.

 

  • preparation

o   Attend keynote lecture Benjamin Schmidt on March 21 (time/program to be announced shortly)

o   Write short essay (1-2 pages) on the connection between your research and Schmidt’s work, or more in specifically, on the theme of the masterclass. Formulate a question for professor Schmidt.

o   Participation in masterclass.

Credits & certificate

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. Event coordinators will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Please direct your request to huizinga@uu.nl and include the postal address you want the certificate to be sent to. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS, you  need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

 

For more information on this masterclass and subscription, please see this page.

Verhuisnieuws

Per 1 januari 2019 is het bureau van het Huizinga Instituut verhuisd van de Universiteit van Amsterdam naar de Universiteit Utrecht. Arnoud Visser is de nieuwe directeur. Hij wordt in die rol bijgestaan door Annelien Krul.

Nieuw postadres
Huizinga Instituut
Trans 10
3512 JK Utrecht

Bezoekadres
Huizinga Instituut
Trans 6, kamer 030
3512 JK Utrecht

Telefoon: 030 2536111
Nieuw emailadres: huizinga@uu.nl
Website: www.huizingainstituut.nl

Met hartelijke groeten,

Afke Berger, Paul Koopman, Annelien Krul, Arnoud Visser en Michael Wintle

Symposium ‘Cultuurgeschiedenis in Nederland: trends en perspectieven’

9 januari 2019
Utrecht (Sweelinckzaal, Drift 21 (0.05))

Het Huizinga Instituut verhuist per 1 januari 2019 naar Utrecht, na 23 jaar in Amsterdam. Met dit symposium op woensdag 9 januari willen we deze verandering markeren en Afke Berger, Paul Koopman, en Michael Wintle bedanken.

Programma

15.45 – 16.00
Inloop

16.00 – 16.15
Welkom (Arnoud Visser)

De betekenis van Michael Wintle en Paul Koopman voor het Huizinga Instituut (Judith Pollmann)

16.15 – 17.00
Inleiding Remieg Aerts ‘Alles is Cultuur‘, gevolgd door een rondetafeldiscussie met Remieg Aerts, Sophie van den Elzen, Willem Frijhoff en Inger Leemans, o.l.v. Jan Hein Furnée.

17.00
Borrel

Toegang vrij; iedereen welkom. Wel graag aanmelden bij huizinga-fgw@uva.nl

Bijeenkomst Projectgroep Egodocumenten

1 maart 2019, 14:00 uur (inloop vanaf 13:30)
Amsterdam, Universiteitsbibliotheek (Potgieterzaal), Singel 425

Programma

  • Lezing door Alle de Jonge over het Nederlands Adelsboek en het Nederlands Patriciaat  als verscholen bron voor biografisch onderzoek.
  • Lezing door Peter Buijs over geluk en identiteit in egodocumenten tussen ca. 1500 en 1850.
    (In vervolg op zijn boek De eeuw van het geluk. Nederlandse opvattingen over geluk ten tijde van de Verlichting, 1658-1835 (Hilversum: Verloren, 2007)
  • Lezing door Wim Denslagen over zelfreflectie en opvatting over het schrijverschap bij beroemde geschiedschrijvers en bij beroemde auteurs van autobiografieën.
    (In vervolg op zijn boek Historisch introspecties. Geschiedschrijvers over geschiedschrijver (Den Haag: Uitgeverij U2pi, 2018).
  • Rondvraag
  • Borrel

Informatie en (niet verplicht) aanmelden:

Rudolf Dekker
Email: rdekker123@gmail.com
Website: www.egodocument.net

PhD Defense Wouter Klein (Utrecht University)

New Drugs for the Dutch Republic: The Commodification of Fever Remedies in the Netherlands (c. 1650-1800)

12 December 2018
12.45 – 13.45
University Hall, Domplein 29, Utrecht

Between 1650 and 1800, advertising for remedies became a standard strategy for all kinds of actors on the medical marketplace of the Netherlands. In digitized newspapers from this period, thousands of medical advertisements can be found. This period can be regarded as the first golden age of medical advertising, predating the era of mass media in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Eighteenth-century newspaper readers had their own ‘pharmaceutical literacy’ to understand and assess the contents of medical advertisements. This literacy was related to their world, in which most medical practice was still plant-based medicine. Many medicinal products became commodities before they were clearly understood in terms of ingredients, provenance or efficacy. Those who had a predominantly commercial interest in medicine (like producers, advertisers, brokers, merchants, and so on), were concerned about enlarging and consolidating their market, more than about quality assurance, proper usage of medical terminology, or the safety of the patient.

Although the success of advertising is difficult to measure, it can be observed that the practice of advertising transformed from an occasional experiment into a structural, appealing strategy to promote remedies. Every local producer of remedies could advertise, to increase the visibility of his practice to a regional, national, even international level. Circumstances beyond the personae of advertisers could influence the availability of new remedies as well, like local epidemics, or international economic and political turmoil. Comparing the trajectories of various remedies over time reveals the dynamic, varying degree of success of new remedies. This is demonstrated in the dissertation of Huizinga member Wouter Klein by the interconnected histories of fever and fever remedies, especially Peruvian bark (the exotic plant product that yields the antimalarial substance quinine). A diachronic analysis of fever and fever remedies demonstrates the usefulness the shifting commercial and cultural importance of new medicinal products, and the bottom-up expansion of a globalizing medical market, in the early modern period.

PhD supervisors: Prof. A.H.L.M. Pieters, Prof. H.G.M. Jorink

Click here for more information.

Inaugural lecture Monika Baár (Leiden University) – ‘Disabling the Iron Curtain’

Disabling the Iron Curtain
An Alternative Perspective on (Central) Europe

14 December 2018
16:00 – 17:00
Academiegebouw Leiden (Rapenburg 73)

The Iron Curtain has become one of the most powerful and persistent metaphors in European historiography. But is it also an accurate notion? Huizinga member Monika Baár will argue in her inaugural lecture that time has come to go beyond Cold War binaries and biases. By taking as its vantage point the history of an understudies group – persons with disabilities – it will propose an alternative way for studying postwar European history. Revisiting the Iron Curtain through this new lens, the lecture will reveal that often what connected people across both sides of the Iron Curtain was way more significant than what divided them.

Registration via this link.

Bijeenkomst projectgroep Egodocumenten met Dirk Schoon en Annette Faber

Vrijdag 9 november 2018
14:00 – 17:00 (inloop vanaf 13:30)
Amsterdam, Roeterseiland (gebouw J/K, zaal 3.50)

Lezingen

Dirk Schoon
Hollanders in de Eeuwige Stad, 1300-1703
Het verblijf van apostolisch vicaris Petrus Codde en het proces dat daar tegen hem werd gevoerd volgens de dagboeken van hemzelf en zijn reisgenoten.

Annette Faber
Elise van Calcar en haar (autobiografische) geschriften (als bronnen in het kader van haar biografie).

Inlichtingen

Rudolf Dekker
Van Breestraat 116
1071 ZV Amsterdam
Tel.020-6719651

 

Masterclass – New Trends in the History of Reading

Date: 13 December 2018
Venue: Museum Plantin Moretus (Antwerp), Vrijdagmarkt 22, 2000
Open to: PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS
Coordination: Prof. Sabrina Corbellini (RUG) & Prof. Wim François (KUL)
Registration (before 1 December 2018): email to ozsmed@rug.nl

The masterclass New Trends in the History of Reading aims at presenting and discussing with ReMa and PhD students the newest development in the study and reconstruction of reading activities in premodern Europe. After a presentation of new theoretical and methodological approaches, the lecturers will engage the participants into a discussion about the approaches selected within the framework of FWO-NWO research project “In Readers’ Hands. Early Modern Dutch Bibles from a Users’ Perspective” (2017-2021), making use of late medieval and early modern printed books from the Plantin Moretus collection.

Further Information:  s.corbellini@rug.nl

 

Masterclass – Professor Yasmin Haskell

Masterclass honouring the 39th Erasmus Birthday Lecture

Yasmin Haskell: Passions for and of Learning in the Early Modern Period

Date: 9 November 2018
Time: 12:00 – 14:15 (welcome from 11:30)
Venue: Trippenhuis, Kloveniersburgwal 29, Amsterdam
ECTS: 1 (participating in masterclass & public lecture + small assignment)
Open to: PhD candidates & RMa students
Further information
Registration

How were the emotions (/passions) harnessed in education and science in the early modern period and which emotions or temperaments were especially associated with scholars and scientists?

How did the emotional experience of the schoolchild/ scholar/scientist differ from that of earlier times, and how were the emotions perceived in different places and contexts to affect, hinder, or further learning or intellectual work?

Participants in this masterclass are invited to explore the emotions in the early modern classroom, academy, and Republic of Letters. From the genial melancholy of Marsilio Ficino to the melancholy hypochondria of the late Renaissance, from the vices of the learned lamented in the German-speaking lands to the occupational hazards of learning deplored by physician Samuel Tissot in his inaugural professorial address at the University of Lausanne, on the ‘Health of Scholars’. Topics might include curiosity, bibliomania, zeal for travel, ambition, pride, anger, excessive admiration for authorities… and sloth!

Register

Fifteen promising young students at graduate level (MA students and PhD candidates) will be selected to participate in this Masterclass. If you are interested, please apply before 20 October via this online form of the KNAW. We will inform you whether your application has been successful before 1 November 2018. The public lecture by Yasmin Haskell will take place later in the afternoon.

Yasmin Haskell

Yasmin Haskell, FAHA, is Chair of Latin and Director of the Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition at the University of Bristol, UK. From 2003-2016 she was Cassamarca Foundation Chair in Latin Humanism at the University of Western Australia, Perth. She is a Partner Investigator (formerly Foundation Chief Investigator) in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions: 1100-1800.

Haskell has published monographs, articles, and edited volumes on neo-Latin poetry, the reception of classical authors, the Latin culture of the early modern Society of Jesus, Latin in the Enlightenment, and the history of psychiatry and emotions, including Loyola’s Bees: Ideology and Industry in Jesuit Latin Didactic Poetry (Oxford: British Academy and Oxford University Press, 2003), Prescribing Ovid: The Latin Works and Networks of the Enlightened Dr Heerkens (London: Bloomsbury, 2013), Diseases of the Imagination and Imaginary Disease in the Early Modern Period (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011), (with Juanita Ruys), Latinity and Alterity in the Early Modern Period (Tempe, AZ and Turnhout: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and Brepols, 2010), and (with Raphaële Garrod), Changing Hearts: Performing Jesuit Emotions Between Europe, Asia and the Americas (forthcoming Leiden: Brill, 2018).

Preliminary bibliography

  • S. Kivistö, The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities, Leiden 2014.
  • P. Hummel, Moeurs érudites: Etude sur la micrologie litteraire (Allemagne, XVIe-XVIIIe siecles), Geneva 2002.
  • Y. Haskell, ‘Physician heal thyself!’ Emotions and the Health of the Learned in Samuel Auguste André Tissot (1728-1797) and Gerard Nicolaas Heerkens (1726-1801)’, in Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment (Springer, 2013), pp. 105-24.

Assignment for 1 ECTS

Will be announced soon.

Public lecture – Professor Toyin Falola (University of Texas)

The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

Date: 10 December 2018
Time: 14:00-17:00, followed by drinks
Venue: Amsterdam, University Library (Doelenzaal), Singel 425
Open to: general public
Registration
The Doelenzaal has a limited number of seats, so we kindly ask you to register if you wish to attend the lecture.

It has been argued that the academic system of knowledge production—as we have known it since the Age of Imperialism/the Enlightenment—is fundamentally Western, wherein the west assumes the status of the “universal”. Although many former colonies around the world (Asia, Africa and Latin America) received political freedom in the second half of the twentieth century, the dominant mode of knowledge production and critical thinking within the academy was, and  still is, largely determined by a western white male perception. Although universities worldwide are able to flourish to some extent, it remains difficult to truly escape from a normative western hegemony on the system of knowledge production and academic research.

The dominance of these thought-patterns originating in the west was never completely unchallenged and gained momentum from the second half of the twentieth century onwards through anticolonial and postcolonial critique, feminist discourse and the emergence of global intellectual history. The new tide of such critical thinking questioned Eurocentric approaches in history, philosophy and anthropology, among others, and argued in favour of a decolonisation of (academic) knowledge production. As a result the humanities have been enriched by crucial debates regarding the place of ‘Europe’ within Academic research as a whole.

This lecture will reflect on the state of the (historical) academy regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’ and raise the question what it means to attempt a ‘Decolonisation of Knowledge’. Is there one Decolonisation or multiple Decolonisations? Is Decolonisation within the academy a monolithic concept or are there multiple layers within this broader academic issue? Most importantly, has knowledge been decolonised at all or is a culture of recolonisation replacing older thought patterns? Through the lecture and the input by local respondents we hope to be able to create an atmosphere in which there will be space for both conceptual in-depth questions and more practical concerns regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’.

With remarks by Karwan Fatah-Black (Leiden University) and Marieke Bloembergen (KITLV).

Toyin Falola

Prof. Falola (1953) is a Nigerian historian of Africa who currently holds the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Falola, who took his PhD-degree at the university of Ile-Ife in Nigeria, is a prolific scholar on African history from the 19th century onwards. He has written both local histories, focusing on Yoruba history in Nigeria, and more globally oriented accounts on the histories of Africa as a whole. Moreover, he has taught and written extensively on African intellectual history and the emergence of the field of African and Black studies, focusing on its pedagogies, methodologies and epistemologies.

Workshop – Cultural Associations in the Long 19th Century: Agents of Transnational (Ex)change

Date: 21 November 2018
Time: 10:00-17:00
Venue: University of Amsterdam, University Library (C0.01 – Potgieterzaal), Singel 425
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: none
Coordination: Dr Krisztina Lajosi (University of Amsterdam)
Maximum participants in this event: 25
Registration (before 15 November 2018)

The workshop will address the political relevance and social importance of cultural and historical societies. Most of these societies were formed in the course of the 19th century and became hubs for intellectual and political networks. Their aim was to promote knowledge, research, and education in a certain field, foster open debate, and in some cases to bolster the importance of a particular nation or region. By combining a cultural and a political agenda, these societies were important agents for social and political movements. Their activities consisted of organizing regular meetings, publishing and disseminating books and periodicals, and giving advice to local or national governments. Such associations helped to shape public opinion and strengthen the sense of collective identity, and had a major impact on the development of linguistic and artistic standards and the preservation of cultural heritage.

Some societies had a strong local influence on shaping the urban public sphere, like the many societies founded in Berlin; others, like the Historical and Literary Society founded by Polish émigrés in Paris in the 1830s, or the Spanish Tertulias in Argentina, became transnational platforms and outposts of political aspirations. Some, like the Maatschappij tot Nut van ‘t Algemeen (Society for Public Welfare) in the Netherlands, became driving forces of civil engagement and democratic reform through knowledge dissemination, while others, like the Slavic Maticas, served as bedrocks of nation-building movements. In this workshop particular attention will be paid to issues such as the dynamics among regional, national and transnational identities, the relevance of societies for the formation of collective identities, and the problem of archiving the collections of such societies in a digital age.

Speakers

  • Prof. Jan Hein Furnée (Radboud University Nijmegen)
  • Dr Maartje Janse (Leiden University) (to be confirmed)
  • Dr Andreas Stynen (KU Leuven)
  • Dr Krisztina Lajosi (Universiteit van Amsterdam)

This workshop is designed as a “prelude” to the International KVNM Symposium to be held in the Paushuize in Utrecht from 22-24 November 2018 on the topic of Musicological Societies as Intermediaries between Society, Musical Life and Academia. For more information see: http://jubileum.kvnm.nl/en/symposia/kvnm-symposium/ .

The aim of the workshop is to situate musical societies in a broader cultural and historical context, and to foster interdisciplinary awareness among PhD and Research Master students interested in sociability and cultural heritage.

Program

  • 9:45 – Welcome & registration
  • 10:00 – Prof. Jan Hein Furneé: Leisure, Societies, and the Emergence of a Public Urban Culture
  • 11:00 – Dr Maartje Janse: Transnational Abolitionist Associations
  • 12:00 – Lunch break
  • 13:00 – Dr Andreas Stynen: Archiving Collective Memory
  • 14:00 – Dr Krisztina Lajosi: Transnational Societies and the Study of “Gypsies”
  • 15:00 – Coffee break
  • 15:20 – Roundtable discussions
  • 16:20 – Final remarks & conclusions
  • 16:30 – Drinks

Recommended readings

  • Stefan Ludwig Hoffmann, Civil society, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2006.
  • Civil society, associations, and urban places: class, nation, and culture in nineteenth-century Europe, eds. Graeme Morton, Boudien de Vries and R.J. Morris, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006.

Workshop – Professor Clive Webb (University of Sussex)

Voices Unheard. Intersections of Race in Transnational and Postcolonial Research

Date: 8 November 2018
Time: 9:00-18:00
Venue: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Medical Faculty Building, MF-A311
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS (available upon request)
Coordination: Dr Dienke Hondius (VU Amsterdam), Lonneke Geerlings (VU Amsterdam)
Maximum participants in this event: 15 (Huizinga members will have first access)
Registration (before 10 October 2018)

This workshop focuses on hidden and forgotten stories at historical crossroads, with a special focus on the African diaspora and discourses on race. Intersections of historical narratives have become increasingly important for historians. We saw this – just to name a few – in research on W.E.B. Du Bois who examined the impact of the Holocaust in Warsaw (Michael Rothberg 2001); on African students in Soviet Russia (Maxim Matusevich 2012); or in the popular novel and movie on the role of Black women in the American space race (Margot Lee Shetterly 2016). The combining of historical narratives often reveal the impact of discourses of race, both on a global scale as well on an individual level.

During this 1-day workshop, researchers are encouraged to look for marginalized or unheard voices in their own materials and to examine their own blind spots. Professor Clive Webb (University of Sussex) will comment on presentations and will also give a guest lecture on how the Holocaust helped shape the American Civil Rights Movement. This workshop may be of interest to PhD students and (research) MA students working on (early) modern history, (post)colonial history, memory studies, comparative and transnational history, and researchers working on gender, race and class.

The masterclass is followed by a VU Graduate School guest lecture of Clive Webb on ‘The Holocaust and The African-American Freedom Struggle’ and is co-organized by the VU Graduate School of Humanities and VU’s CLUE+ Research Institute for Culture, History and Heritage.

Speaker

Clive Webb is Professor of Modern American History at the University of Sussex in Brighton (United Kingdom). He is specialized in the history of race and ethnicity in Britain and the United States. His first book, Fight Against Fear, focused on the reaction of the small Jewish minority in the American South to the black civil rights struggle. A second book, Rabble Rousers, looked at white extremists who used violence to resist civil rights reform. Most recently, he co-wrote with William Carrigan of Rowan University in New Jersey Forgotten Dead, a book that assesses mob violence against Mexicans in the United States. His current research focuses on the historical relationship between Britain and the United States including such issues as race, politics and culture. For more details see http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/109349.

Program

  • 9:00
    Welcome
  • 9:15
    Screening documentary (TBA)
  • 11:00
    Creative writing exercises
  • 12:00
    Lunch break (at own expense / bring-your-own)
  • 13:00
    Presentations by contributors, followed by discussion and feedback from Clive Webb
  • 14:30
    Short break
  • 14:45
    Presentations + discussion (part 2)
  • 16:15
    Coffee & tea break
  • 16:30
    VU Graduate School Guest lecture with Clive Webb: ‘The Holocaust and The African-American Freedom Struggle’
  • 17:30
    Drinks

Preparation

All participants are asked to write an essay (max. 2 pages) on their own research, connecting their research with the proposed readings. In addition, they should also prepare a short presentation. Non-participants should read the supporting texts in advance and prepare comments or questions arising from the readings. Participants who want to receive 1 ECTS are expected to complete the following assignments. Please send the essay and PowerPoint presentation to the organizers one week before the workshop.

1: Writing exercise (all participants)

Please bring pen and paper (preferably) – or a laptop. Through creative writing exercises all participants and attendants will practice their writing skills. This is a perfect exercise if you need to overcome your writer’s block.

2: Essay (only for participants wanting to receive credits)

Describe in an essay of approximately two pages how you use, or could use, intersections in history to reveal hidden, forgotten or marginalized histories. What voices remain unheard in the historical sources that you use for your project? Would a comparative, transnational or postcolonial approach be a valuable addition to your research?

3: PowerPoint presentation (only for participants wanting to receive credits)

Prepare a PowerPoint presentation (4 to 5 minutes) about your essay. This will be followed by 5 minutes for comments and discussion. These presentations are a showcase of your research: there is ample time to discuss your research further during the breaks and drinks afterwards.

Readings

Please read the following articles/chapters (these will be shared with you after signing up):

  • Clive Webb, Fight Against Fear. Southern Jews and Black Civil Rights. University of Georgia Press, 2001. Chapter 4, pages 69-87.
  • Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization. Stanford University Press, 2009. Introduction, pages 1-29.

Credits and certificate

Interested students and researchers can participate in two ways: as an active auditor or as a contributor. Contributors are expected to submit a short paper (max 2 pages, may be sent to Huizinga-fgw@uva.nl one week before the workshop) and give a presentation, which are both required for earning 1 ECTS. These papers, together with the proposed literature from the speakers, will be distributed to all participants in advance, and will be a starting point for the discussion.

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. Event coordinators will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Please direct your request to Huizinga-fgw@uva.nl and include the postal address you want the certificate to be sent to. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS; you need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

Masterclass – Professor Toyin Falola (University of Texas)

The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

Date: 10 December 2018
Time: 10:00-12:30 (masterclass) & 14:00-17:00 (keynote lecture and discussion)
Venue: Amsterdam, Bushuis (VOC-zaal) & University Library (Doelenzaal)
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS (for PhD and RMa students only)
Coordination: Larissa Schulte Nordholt (Leiden University) and Marleen Reichgelt (Radboud University Nijmegen)
Maximum participants in this event: 20
Registration (before 1 November 2018)

It has been argued that the academic system of knowledge production—as we have known it since the Age of Imperialism/the Enlightenment—is fundamentally Western, wherein the west assumes the status of the “universal”. Although many former colonies around the world (Asia, Africa and Latin America) received political freedom in the second half of the twentieth century, the dominant mode of knowledge production and critical thinking within the academy was, and  still is, largely determined by a western white male perception. Although universities worldwide are able to flourish to some extent, it remains difficult to truly escape from a normative western hegemony on the system of knowledge production and academic research.

The dominance of these thought-patterns originating in the west was never completely unchallenged and gained momentum from the second half of the twentieth century onwards through anticolonial and postcolonial critique, feminist discourse and the emergence of global intellectual history. The new tide of such critical thinking questioned Eurocentric approaches in history, philosophy and anthropology, among others, and argued in favour of a decolonisation of (academic) knowledge production. As a result the humanities have been enriched by crucial debates regarding the place of ‘Europe’ within Academic research as a whole.

To apply the insights from these debates to one’s research, however, can be a challenging feat – both on a theoretical and a practical level. This masterclass aims to revisit the state of the art on theories of decolonisation of academic research. Junior researchers will be given the chance to engage with questions concerning mental decolonization as they pertain to their own research projects. The goal is to inform students and researchers of cultural history about ongoing debates on Decolonisation and knowledge production from a global intellectual perspective.

Toyin Falola

Prof. Falola (1953) is a Nigerian historian of Africa who currently holds the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Falola, who took his PhD-degree at the university of Ile-Ife in Nigeria, is a prolific scholar on African history from the 19th century onwards. He has written both local histories, focusing on Yoruba history in Nigeria, and more globally oriented accounts on the histories of Africa as a whole. Moreover, he has taught and written extensively on African intellectual history and the emergence of the field of African and Black studies, focusing on its pedagogies, methodologies and epistemologies.

Literature and preparation

A list of required readings and information about the assignment will be sent to the admitted participants in the course of November.