13-03-2020: educational activities Huizinga Institute suspended

Dear all,

In response to the government’s call responding to the outbreak of the coronavirus, Dutch universities are currently suspending face-to-face teaching until March 31st in order to help curb the spread of the virus.

In line with these measures, the Huizinga Institute has also suspended all face-to-face educational activities until the end of March. We are closely monitoring the situation regarding courses beyond March and will keep all participants informed.

Should you have any questions in the meantime, please do not hesitate to consult the Huizinga office.

We hope for your understanding and wish you all good health.

With all best,

Arnoud Visser, director Huizinga Institute
Annelien Krul, coordinator Huizinga Institute

Save the date: 12 May 2020 – Huizinga/OSL workshop ‘From Distant Reading to Distant Viewing: Using Computer Vision to Enrich Historical and Literary Research’

The Hague | 12 May 2020

Time: 10.00 – 17.00. Venue: Dutch Royal Library (Koninklijke Bibliotheek), Prins Willem-Alexanderhof 5, 2595 BE The Hague. Open to: PhD candidates and RMA students who are a member of a Dutch National Research School. Members of OSL and the Huizinga Institute have first access.

Available places: 20 (lecture programme + workshop) and an additional 20 places for auditors (lecture programme only).

Credits: More details on credits and assignments will be available soon; registration will open in early April.

Coordination: Sophie van den Elzen and Thomas Smits (Utrecht University)
Keynote: Leo Impett (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome); more guests will be announced soon.

Description:

Digital humanities research has long been strongly textually oriented (Arnold and Tilton 2019). Increasingly, however, methods are being developed to incorporate the visual into DH analyses. This workshop will introduce participants to the basics of “distant viewing”: cutting-edge computer vision techniques in humanities research.

Like distant reading, these methods have proven useful to perform (historical) cultural analyses at a macro-scale. They can be used, for instance, to analyze the relationship between text and image in the nineteenth-century transnational press, to map the circulation of images in internet culture, to do visual stylometry (authorship attribution), or to study pictorial traditions, genres and motives in thousands of paintings. However, technological gains in computer vision go beyond merely increasing the scale at which we can research cultural phenomena. They also have the potential to change how we understand the cultural work of the visual vs. the textual, as they challenge traditional views of how images are consumed, cognitively processed, and assigned meaning (Moretti and Impett 2017; Arnold and Tilton 2019).

The day is intended for early-stage researchers who would like to learn about the principles, possibilities and pitfalls of research methods based on computer vision. Learning more about this may complement what you already know about digital humanities methods of ‘distant reading’, or help you think about how your current research questions could be operationalized at the larger scale. Or it may inspire you to formulate new project ideas. In any case, by the end of the day, you will have a sense of 1) what sorts of new research questions you can formulate with these methods, 2) what the workflow of this research looks like and 3) where to start: what are some collections, at the KB and beyond, which you can begin to explore using these techniques.

The day will start with a keynote by Leo Impett, whose work applies computer vision to analyze Aby Warburg’s Bilderatlas. After this, the trainers will give brief presentations on their own research, which are intended to inspire you to look at the possibilities of these methods for your own research interests. The afternoon consists of a hands-on workshop for max. 20 participants, in which we will go on a guided computational exploration of a dataset using the programming language Python. The day will also offer ample opportunity to discuss research ideas with trainers, peers and members of the KB team.

 

Registration will open in early April; more details on schedule, assignments and registration will be provided soon.

Eddy Grootes (22 maart 1936 – 5 februari 2020)

Met verdriet heeft het Huizinga Instituut kennisgenomen van het overlijden van Eddy Grootes (1936), emeritus hoogleraar Historische Nederlandse letterkunde aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Hij overleed op 5 februari 2020. We nemen afscheid van een wijze en geliefde collega die als initiatiefnemer, oprichter en eerste directeur een belangrijke rol heeft gespeeld voor het Huizinga Instituut.

Cancelled: Masterclass Alison Landsberg: ‘Representing the Past: Memory, Aesthetics, Politics’

Masterclass Alison Landsberg (George Mason University, Fairfax VA, USA): ‘Representing the Past: Memory, Aesthetics, Politics’

 

This masterclass is part of the international conference “The Stage of War: Academic and Popular Representations of Large-Scale Conflicts” that will take place on 26-27 March 2020 in Rotterdam (attendance required, find the full programme here).

 

Dates & time

Symposium: 26-27 March 2020 (10:00-17:30)

Masterclass: 27 March 2020 (time tba)

 

Venue: Erasmus University Rotterdam, Campus, M-Building

Masterclass open to: PhD students and Research Master Students

ECTS: 1

Available places: 15.

Costs: None – the symposium fee is included. When you are admitted to this masterclass, you will automatically be registered for the conference. Please note: the conference dinner in Hotel New York on Thursday 26 March (€35,-) is excluded and can be booked separately by informing the Huizinga Institute.

Registration: register here. Registration deadline: 2 March 2020 – Unfortunately this event is fully booked – please contact the Huizinga office for a spot on the waiting list

 

Description

The conference ‘The Stage of War’ focuses on academic and popular representations of war and other large-scale conflicts. Keynote speaker Alison Landsberg (George Mason University, Fairfax VA, USA) will build on her keynote lecture in the masterclass ‘Representing the Past: Memory, Aesthetics, Politics’.

 

The masterclass is organized by the Huizinga Institute i.c.w. Maria Grever and Siri Driessen, and is aimed at PhD candidates and Research Master Students. Participants will receive 1 ECTS after successful participation. Attending the symposium (both days) is a mandatory part of the masterclass.

 

A detailed programme will be made available soon, but registration is already possible.

 

Indication of preparatory literature:

 

Parts of/excerpts from:

 

  • Walter Benjamin, On the Concept of History
  • Alison Landsberg, Engaging the Past: Mass Culture and the Production of Historical Knowledge, Columbia University Press 2015
  • Jacques Rancière, Politics of Aesthetics

 

Postponed: Huizinga PhD conference – 30 & 31 March 2020, Dominicanenklooster Huissen

Date: 30 & 31 March 2020
Venue: Dominicanenklooster Huissen
Open to: PhD candidates and RMA-students (exclusive for Huizinga members)
ECTS, only for PhD candidates: 3 (with presentation), 1 (auditor)

Registration: Huizinga staff members, ReMa students and PhD candidates of all years are more than welcome to join this conference as auditors. Register here

Third-year PhD candidates who are members of the Huizinga Instituut present (a part of) their research at this conference. Their talks will be discussed by co-referents (who have been invited by the candidates themselves) and the audience.

Programme:

 

Monday 30 March 2020

Chair: Prof. dr. Arnoud Visser

 

10:15                    Welcome and introduction

10:30                    Workshop by Griet Coupé

                                How to give Effective Feedback

 11:30                    Sam de Schutter (Leiden University)
‘From a liability into an asset’: Transnational entanglements of disability and development in Tanzania, 1940s-1980s
Referent: Dr. Walter Nkwi Gam (UL)

12:30                    Lunch

13:45                    Larissa Schulte Nordholt (Leiden University)
What Is an African Historian? Negotiating Scholarly Personae in UNESCO’S General History of Africa
Referent: Dr. Walter Nkwi Gam (UL)

14:45                    Ayşenur Korkmaz (University of Amsterdam)
‘Sacred’ Journeys ‘Sacred’ Destinations: Ottoman-Armenian Roots Tourism in Eastern Turkey
Referent: prof. dr. Irene Stengs (VU)

15:45                    Coffee and tea

16:00                    Paul Hulsenboom (Radboud University)
Danzig Poets on Dutch Politics: The Place and Function of ‘Dutch’ Topics in Seventeenth-Century Poetry from Danzig
Referent: dr. Dirk van Miert (UU)

17:00                    Cora van de Poppe (Utrecht University)
Reader Management in P.C. Hooft’s Prose: Material and Linguistic Approaches
Referent: Prof. dr. Johan Koppenol (VU)

18:00                    Drinks and dinner

 

Tuesday 31 March 2020

                                Chair: Fons Meijer MA

 10:15                    Desiree Krikken (University of Groningen)
How to observe the landscape? The consolidation of a rhetoric of utility in early modern land surveying texts
Referent: TBA

11:15                   Frank Birkenholz (University of Groningen)
A ferocious paper consumer: the VOC’s acquisition and distribution of paper
Referent: TBA

12:15                    Lunch

13:45                    Renske Hoff (University of Groningen)
Transformative reading: the dynamic connection between early printed Bibles (1522-1546) and their readers
Referent: prof. dr. August den Hollander (VU)

14:45                    Didi van Trijp (Leiden University)
Marcus Élieser Bloch’s Fish Collection and the Politics of Preservation in Eighteenth-Century Europe
Referent: prof. dr. Wijnand Mijnhardt (UU)

15:45                    Coffee and tea

16:00                    Berrie van der Molen (Utrecht University)
Talking XTC: Tracing the discursive formation of ecstasy in current affairs programs on Radio 1
Referent: Dr. Alec Badenoch (UU)

17:00                    Anne van Veen (Utrecht University)
E is for Ethics? The Formation of Animal Experimental Committees in the Netherlands
Referent: Dr. Frans Stafleu (UU)

18:00                    Drinks

 

 

 

Huizinga/KNIR/Hertziana course ‘Cultures of Science and Art in Rome, 1400-1900’ (8-17 May 2020) – Deadline for applications: 22 January 2020

Apple before 15 January via the KNIR website.

Course Content
As city of the pope, Rome has been an important religious and artistic center since the Middle Ages. It is less well known that Rome has also been a center of scientific research and the visualization thereof. This fact has been undervalued because of the traditional, but by now outdated, opposition between religion and science. Religion and science were by no means mutually exclusive, as the scientific activities of the Jesuits show. Therefore, this course will introduce Rome as a city of knowledge in its European and global contexts from 1400 until 1900. By looking specifically at the visual culture of science participants will learn about the networks that brought together artists, collectors, and intellectuals, and how these actors and their ideas influenced the practice of science and its visualization.

On the basis of case studies and interdisciplinary approaches – e.g. historical, art historical, digital humanities – participants will delve into this understudied aspect of cultural history. During the course we will visit a variety of sites in Rome (archives, libraries, churches, and museums) and analyze many different sources (manuscripts, printed books, prints, paintings, sculptures, photographs, architecture, and film) in order to analyzes and understand the city from the perspective of science and art.

Staff
dr. Sietske Fransen and dr. Matthijs Jonker

Target group and admission
The course is open to 8 RMA and PhD students who are a member of a Dutch National Research School (members of the Huizinga Institute have first access) and 8 international RMA and PhD students. The selection of RMA students is based on grades, the positioning of the course in the student’s curriculum, and a letter of motivation. The selection of PhD students is based on the letter of motivation and curriculum vitae. Students can apply via the link below. Include in your application:
– a letter of motivation
– a cv
– for RMA students: a recent list of grades officially provided by your university

Course format and assignments
Preparatory assignment, group assignment in Rome, individual presentation in Rome, final essay.

Credits and assessment
The study load is the equivalent of 5 ECTS (140 hours).

Costs
Tuition and lodging at the KNIR for selected participants is covered by the Huizinga Instituut (for students from Dutch universities) and by the Bibliotheca Hertziana (for international students). Personal expenses, including meals, are not included. Students can request a € 175,00 reimbursement of their expenses for travelling to Rome at the Huizinga Instituut, after submission of their final essay.

Facilities in Rome
All participants will be housed at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome’s Villa Borghese Park. From there, it is only a short walk to the historical center of Rome. The KNIR accommodation consists of shared bedrooms and bathrooms, and includes a living and dining space, a large kitchen, washing machine and wireless internet. All residents have 24/7 access to the library and gardens of the Royal Netherlands Institute.

Apply before
22 January 2020 via this link, submitting a motivation letter, a recent C.V. and an updated overview of study results.

More info
E-mail: secretary@knir.it
Phone: (+39)063269621

Huizinga Summer School 2020: ‘Doing digital history. Critical approaches to your data’ (5 ECTS)

Dates and time: 8-9-10 July 2020
Venue: Erasmus University Rotterdam
Open to: RMa Students and PhD students who are a member of a Dutch Graduate Research School (onderzoekschool). Members of the Huizinga Institute will have first access until 1 December 2019.
Fee (nonmembers of a Dutch National Research School): € 250
Credits: 5 ECTS
Coordination: TBA
Register here. Maximum participants in this event: 20 – Unfortunately this course is fully booked – please contact the Huizinga office for a spot on the waiting list.

 

Description, Themes & Objectives

Are you wondering about how digital history can be applied in your research? Curious to learn where and how you can access historical sources for your PhD/ReMA project online? Would you like to critically explore new digital methodologies?

This 3-day summer school aims to acquaint and familiarise you with different digital sources and methodologies that are relevant for cultural historians (as well as political and social historians) in various fields of interest; from early modern to contemporary history. Our summer school provides an opportunity to experiment with and reflect on different types of datasets: from textual to audiovisual sources.

It offers hands-on workshops in small groups and under close supervision of experts, inspiring lectures by experienced digital historians and plenty of opportunity to engage in critical reflection with both experts and fellow participants. How do you explore large datasets and perform source criticism in – at times opaque – digital environments? In what ways does ‘going digital’ add to, change or challenge, your own practice as a historian?

Our team of experts will preselect a set of collections and tools that are suitable for your own PhD/ReMA research, based on your level of experience. In two to three modules, you will learn how to use this selection of datasets and tools to answer a research question of your own, visualise your results, and critically reflect on the process of ‘doing digital history’.

We welcome all levels of experience, beginners included!

Organizers:
Department of History and Erasmus Studio
Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication (ESHCC)
Erasmus University Rotterdam

Contact:
Norah Karrouche
karrouche@eshcc.eur.nl

Research Master course ‘Heritage and Memory Theory Seminar’ (5 ECTS)

Dates and time: 30 April, 8 May, 14 May, 20 May (note: not 22 May as previously advertised), 28 May (14:00-18:00);  11 June (12-20h) 2020 (note: not 5 June as previously advertised)
Venue: University of Amsterdam (room TBA)
Open to: RMa Students who are a member of a Dutch Graduate Research School (onderzoekschool). RMa Students who are members of the Huizinga Institute will have first access until 1 December 2019. PhD Candidates are allowed to register, however RMa Students will have first access.
Fee (nonmembers of a Dutch National Research School): € 250
Credits: 5 ECTS
Coordination: Prof. dr Ihab Saloul (University of Amsterdam)
Register here. Maximum participants in this event: 20 – Unfortunately this course is fully booked – please contact the Huizinga office for a spot on the waiting list

 

Description, Themes & Objectives

The analytical study of heritage and memory studies poses particular problems of method for all, from beginners to very experienced scholars. Due to its fundamental interdisciplinary, transnational and comparative nature, this seminar devises a specific format that explicitly addresses the methodological ins and outs of heritage and memory studies. We will critically examine the dynamics of the past from the perspective of tangible and intangible remnants, spaces and traces as well as the politics of forgetting and heritage appropriations, significations, musealizations and mediatization in the present. How key sites of heritage and memory in Europe and beyond are presented, interpreted, and renegotiated? And how do memory discourses operate as vehicles of local, national, continental and global identity building? Key topics will address the multidirectionality of heritage and memory as well as the theoretical implications identity and trauma, mourning and reconciliation, nationalism and ethnicity, diaspora and intergenerational memories, landscapes and mass violence, heritage preservation and commemorations, experience and authenticity, (dark) tourism, diaspora and postcolonial memory, and performative reenactments and the art of absence and forgetting. The objectives are to:

  • Introduce researchers to central concepts in the field of heritage and memory studies
  • Provide training with samples from advanced theoretical texts (reading, understanding, discussing and integrating literature in the researchers’ own projects)
Organization & Programme

The intellectual engagement with heritage and memory concepts and the ideas they develop is both necessary and often, quite problematic. In this 6-day seminar the collective effort to deal with this issue is as important as the acquisition of knowledge. The conceptual premise underlying this analytical approach is that interdisciplinary lacks the traditional paradigms that used to provide obvious methodological tools. Concepts offer a substitute; a methodology that is flexible, yet responsible and accountable. The aim is to open up an academic space where a common ground can be found without sacrificing specific and precious disciplinary knowledge.

The program will be announced in advance but the general format is a 3-hour seminar session with an introductory lecture, presentations and a class discussion. In preparation students will be given some theoretical texts to read; a full list of literature will be provided in advance. All participants are expected to:

  • Attend all sessions and read the texts seriously
  • During each session teams of two or three participants will present an object/case study of their own choice on which they bring to bear the texts and concepts
  • Write a 2000-word report with a special focus on a theme of choice.
Credits & Certificate

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. Event coordinators will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS, you need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

Research Master course ‘Cultures of Reading’ (5 ECTS)

Dates: Fridays 24 April, 1 May, 15 May, 29 May, 12 June 2020
Time: 13.15-16.15h
Venue: Utrecht University (Drift 21, room 0.06) and Utrecht University Library (29 May: Bucheliuszaal)
Open to: RMa Students who are a member of a Dutch Graduate Research School (onderzoekschool). RMa Students who are members of the Huizinga Institute will have first access until 1 December 2019; PhD candidates can attend as auditor (limited number)
Fee (non members of a Dutch National Research School): € 150
Credits: 5 ECTS
Coordinator: Arnoud Visser (UU)
Register here. Maximum participants in this event: 25 – Unfortunately this course is fully booked – please contact the Huizinga office for a spot on the waiting list

Cultures of Reading

Since the early modern period, reading has been essential for the transmission of ideas, but it is also a vital skill for the cultural historian. Reading is not a stable form of communication. It may be done in many different ways, depending on a host of historical, social, and religious contexts. In the past three decades the ‘History of Reading’ has become a vibrant scholarly field, exploring both historical practices as well as our own as researchers of earlier periods in history. Historians such as Robert Darnton, Carlo Ginzburg, Roger Chartier, Anthony Grafton, and William Sherman have developed challenging new approaches, highlighting a diversity of reading styles and at least as great a variety of research opportunities.

This course serves as an introduction to the cultural history of reading. In a series of lectures and seminars, the phenomenon of reading cultures is studied from a variety of different historical and disciplinary perspectives by academics from across the field of cultural history in the Netherlands, assisted by guest speakers from abroad.

The lectures and seminars that constitute the core of this course will be complemented by a working visit to the UU special collections.

Credits & Certificate

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. The event coordinator will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS, you need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

Huizinga ReMa/PhD curriculum 2019-2020

We are proud to present our ReMa and PhD curriculum for the forthcoming academic year:

 

Core curriculum Research master students:

Core curriculum PhD candidates:

  • PhD conference I (October 2019, 3 ECTS)
  • CCOI: Research into Cultural History Course (January-May 2020, 5 ECTS)
  • PhD conference II (Spring 2020, 3 ECTS)
  • CCOII: Anxiety with Sources (Spring 2020, 1 ECTS)
    Core curriculum ReMa-courses are also open to PhD candidates

Masterclasses, workshops and ateliers (open to both Research master students and PhD candidates):

And more TBA

Share your plans: organize a masterclass, workshop or other Huizinga-activity

Our goal is to give you the best education opportunities possible. That requires a demand-driven programme, for which we need your help. Do you miss anything in the Huizinga Institute’s programme? And do you have ideas for a ReMa-PhD Masterclass, Workshop, Atelier or course? Or an activity focused on community/platform building? For examples, see our page on workshops and masterclasses.

We greatly welcome initiatives from ReMa-students, PhD candidates and Senior researchers, and have budget available to support several activities each year. Organizers may receive ECTS credits for their efforts. To submit your proposal, please fill out the application form and send it to coordinator Annelien Krul (huizinga@uu.nl). She is also available to discuss the possibilities and to answer any questions.

We look forward to hearing from you!