Masterclass – New Trends in the History of Reading

Date: 13 December 2018
Venue: Museum Plantin Moretus (Antwerp), Vrijdagmarkt 22, 2000
Open to: PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS
Coordination: Prof. Sabrina Corbellini (RUG) & Prof. Wim François (KUL)
Registration (before 1 December 2018): email to ozsmed@rug.nl

The masterclass New Trends in the History of Reading aims at presenting and discussing with ReMa and PhD students the newest development in the study and reconstruction of reading activities in premodern Europe. After a presentation of new theoretical and methodological approaches, the lecturers will engage the participants into a discussion about the approaches selected within the framework of FWO-NWO research project “In Readers’ Hands. Early Modern Dutch Bibles from a Users’ Perspective” (2017-2021), making use of late medieval and early modern printed books from the Plantin Moretus collection.

Further Information:  s.corbellini@rug.nl

 

Masterclass – Professor Yasmin Haskell

Masterclass honouring the 39th Erasmus Birthday Lecture

Yasmin Haskell: Passions for and of Learning in the Early Modern Period

Date: 9 November 2018
Time: 12:00 – 14:15 (welcome from 11:30)
Venue: Trippenhuis, Kloveniersburgwal 29, Amsterdam
ECTS: 1 (participating in masterclass & public lecture + small assignment)
Open to: PhD candidates & RMa students
Further information
Registration

How were the emotions (/passions) harnessed in education and science in the early modern period and which emotions or temperaments were especially associated with scholars and scientists?

How did the emotional experience of the schoolchild/ scholar/scientist differ from that of earlier times, and how were the emotions perceived in different places and contexts to affect, hinder, or further learning or intellectual work?

Participants in this masterclass are invited to explore the emotions in the early modern classroom, academy, and Republic of Letters. From the genial melancholy of Marsilio Ficino to the melancholy hypochondria of the late Renaissance, from the vices of the learned lamented in the German-speaking lands to the occupational hazards of learning deplored by physician Samuel Tissot in his inaugural professorial address at the University of Lausanne, on the ‘Health of Scholars’. Topics might include curiosity, bibliomania, zeal for travel, ambition, pride, anger, excessive admiration for authorities… and sloth!

Register

Fifteen promising young students at graduate level (MA students and PhD candidates) will be selected to participate in this Masterclass. If you are interested, please apply before 20 October via this online form of the KNAW. We will inform you whether your application has been successful before 1 November 2018. The public lecture by Yasmin Haskell will take place later in the afternoon.

Yasmin Haskell

Yasmin Haskell, FAHA, is Chair of Latin and Director of the Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition at the University of Bristol, UK. From 2003-2016 she was Cassamarca Foundation Chair in Latin Humanism at the University of Western Australia, Perth. She is a Partner Investigator (formerly Foundation Chief Investigator) in the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions: 1100-1800.

Haskell has published monographs, articles, and edited volumes on neo-Latin poetry, the reception of classical authors, the Latin culture of the early modern Society of Jesus, Latin in the Enlightenment, and the history of psychiatry and emotions, including Loyola’s Bees: Ideology and Industry in Jesuit Latin Didactic Poetry (Oxford: British Academy and Oxford University Press, 2003), Prescribing Ovid: The Latin Works and Networks of the Enlightened Dr Heerkens (London: Bloomsbury, 2013), Diseases of the Imagination and Imaginary Disease in the Early Modern Period (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011), (with Juanita Ruys), Latinity and Alterity in the Early Modern Period (Tempe, AZ and Turnhout: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and Brepols, 2010), and (with Raphaële Garrod), Changing Hearts: Performing Jesuit Emotions Between Europe, Asia and the Americas (forthcoming Leiden: Brill, 2018).

Preliminary bibliography

  • S. Kivistö, The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities, Leiden 2014.
  • P. Hummel, Moeurs érudites: Etude sur la micrologie litteraire (Allemagne, XVIe-XVIIIe siecles), Geneva 2002.
  • Y. Haskell, ‘Physician heal thyself!’ Emotions and the Health of the Learned in Samuel Auguste André Tissot (1728-1797) and Gerard Nicolaas Heerkens (1726-1801)’, in Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment (Springer, 2013), pp. 105-24.

Assignment for 1 ECTS

Will be announced soon.

Public lecture – Professor Toyin Falola (University of Texas)

The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

Date: 10 December 2018
Time: 14:00-17:00, followed by drinks
Venue: Amsterdam, University Library (Doelenzaal), Singel 425
Open to: general public
Registration
The Doelenzaal has a limited number of seats, so we kindly ask you to register if you wish to attend the lecture.

It has been argued that the academic system of knowledge production—as we have known it since the Age of Imperialism/the Enlightenment—is fundamentally Western, wherein the west assumes the status of the “universal”. Although many former colonies around the world (Asia, Africa and Latin America) received political freedom in the second half of the twentieth century, the dominant mode of knowledge production and critical thinking within the academy was, and  still is, largely determined by a western white male perception. Although universities worldwide are able to flourish to some extent, it remains difficult to truly escape from a normative western hegemony on the system of knowledge production and academic research.

The dominance of these thought-patterns originating in the west was never completely unchallenged and gained momentum from the second half of the twentieth century onwards through anticolonial and postcolonial critique, feminist discourse and the emergence of global intellectual history. The new tide of such critical thinking questioned Eurocentric approaches in history, philosophy and anthropology, among others, and argued in favour of a decolonisation of (academic) knowledge production. As a result the humanities have been enriched by crucial debates regarding the place of ‘Europe’ within Academic research as a whole.

This lecture will reflect on the state of the (historical) academy regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’ and raise the question what it means to attempt a ‘Decolonisation of Knowledge’. Is there one Decolonisation or multiple Decolonisations? Is Decolonisation within the academy a monolithic concept or are there multiple layers within this broader academic issue? Most importantly, has knowledge been decolonised at all or is a culture of recolonisation replacing older thought patterns? Through the lecture and the input by local respondents we hope to be able to create an atmosphere in which there will be space for both conceptual in-depth questions and more practical concerns regarding the ‘Idea of Decolonisation’.

With remarks by Karwan Fatah-Black (Leiden University) and Marieke Bloembergen (KITLV).

Toyin Falola

Prof. Falola (1953) is a Nigerian historian of Africa who currently holds the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Falola, who took his PhD-degree at the university of Ile-Ife in Nigeria, is a prolific scholar on African history from the 19th century onwards. He has written both local histories, focusing on Yoruba history in Nigeria, and more globally oriented accounts on the histories of Africa as a whole. Moreover, he has taught and written extensively on African intellectual history and the emergence of the field of African and Black studies, focusing on its pedagogies, methodologies and epistemologies.

Workshop – Cultural Associations in the Long 19th Century: Agents of Transnational (Ex)change

Date: 21 November 2018
Time: 10:00-17:00
Venue: University of Amsterdam, University Library (C0.01 – Potgieterzaal), Singel 425
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: none
Coordination: Dr Krisztina Lajosi (University of Amsterdam)
Maximum participants in this event: 25
Registration (before 15 November 2018)

The workshop will address the political relevance and social importance of cultural and historical societies. Most of these societies were formed in the course of the 19th century and became hubs for intellectual and political networks. Their aim was to promote knowledge, research, and education in a certain field, foster open debate, and in some cases to bolster the importance of a particular nation or region. By combining a cultural and a political agenda, these societies were important agents for social and political movements. Their activities consisted of organizing regular meetings, publishing and disseminating books and periodicals, and giving advice to local or national governments. Such associations helped to shape public opinion and strengthen the sense of collective identity, and had a major impact on the development of linguistic and artistic standards and the preservation of cultural heritage.

Some societies had a strong local influence on shaping the urban public sphere, like the many societies founded in Berlin; others, like the Historical and Literary Society founded by Polish émigrés in Paris in the 1830s, or the Spanish Tertulias in Argentina, became transnational platforms and outposts of political aspirations. Some, like the Maatschappij tot Nut van ‘t Algemeen (Society for Public Welfare) in the Netherlands, became driving forces of civil engagement and democratic reform through knowledge dissemination, while others, like the Slavic Maticas, served as bedrocks of nation-building movements. In this workshop particular attention will be paid to issues such as the dynamics among regional, national and transnational identities, the relevance of societies for the formation of collective identities, and the problem of archiving the collections of such societies in a digital age.

Speakers

  • Prof. Jan Hein Furnée (Radboud University Nijmegen)
  • Dr Maartje Janse (Leiden University) (to be confirmed)
  • Dr Andreas Stynen (KU Leuven)
  • Dr Krisztina Lajosi (Universiteit van Amsterdam)

This workshop is designed as a “prelude” to the International KVNM Symposium to be held in the Paushuize in Utrecht from 22-24 November 2018 on the topic of Musicological Societies as Intermediaries between Society, Musical Life and Academia. For more information see: http://jubileum.kvnm.nl/en/symposia/kvnm-symposium/ .

The aim of the workshop is to situate musical societies in a broader cultural and historical context, and to foster interdisciplinary awareness among PhD and Research Master students interested in sociability and cultural heritage.

Program

  • 9:45 – Welcome & registration
  • 10:00 – Prof. Jan Hein Furneé: Leisure, Societies, and the Emergence of a Public Urban Culture
  • 11:00 – Dr Maartje Janse: Transnational Abolitionist Associations
  • 12:00 – Lunch break
  • 13:00 – Dr Andreas Stynen: Archiving Collective Memory
  • 14:00 – Dr Krisztina Lajosi: Transnational Societies and the Study of “Gypsies”
  • 15:00 – Coffee break
  • 15:20 – Roundtable discussions
  • 16:20 – Final remarks & conclusions
  • 16:30 – Drinks

Recommended readings

  • Stefan Ludwig Hoffmann, Civil society, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2006.
  • Civil society, associations, and urban places: class, nation, and culture in nineteenth-century Europe, eds. Graeme Morton, Boudien de Vries and R.J. Morris, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006.

Workshop – Professor Clive Webb (University of Sussex)

Voices Unheard. Intersections of Race in Transnational and Postcolonial Research

Date: 8 November 2018
Time: 9:00-18:00
Venue: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Medical Faculty Building, MF-A311
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS (available upon request)
Coordination: Dr Dienke Hondius (VU Amsterdam), Lonneke Geerlings (VU Amsterdam)
Maximum participants in this event: 15 (Huizinga members will have first access)
Registration (before 10 October 2018)

This workshop focuses on hidden and forgotten stories at historical crossroads, with a special focus on the African diaspora and discourses on race. Intersections of historical narratives have become increasingly important for historians. We saw this – just to name a few – in research on W.E.B. Du Bois who examined the impact of the Holocaust in Warsaw (Michael Rothberg 2001); on African students in Soviet Russia (Maxim Matusevich 2012); or in the popular novel and movie on the role of Black women in the American space race (Margot Lee Shetterly 2016). The combining of historical narratives often reveal the impact of discourses of race, both on a global scale as well on an individual level.

During this 1-day workshop, researchers are encouraged to look for marginalized or unheard voices in their own materials and to examine their own blind spots. Professor Clive Webb (University of Sussex) will comment on presentations and will also give a guest lecture on how the Holocaust helped shape the American Civil Rights Movement. This workshop may be of interest to PhD students and (research) MA students working on (early) modern history, (post)colonial history, memory studies, comparative and transnational history, and researchers working on gender, race and class.

The masterclass is followed by a VU Graduate School guest lecture of Clive Webb on ‘The Holocaust and The African-American Freedom Struggle’ and is co-organized by the VU Graduate School of Humanities and VU’s CLUE+ Research Institute for Culture, History and Heritage.

Speaker

Clive Webb is Professor of Modern American History at the University of Sussex in Brighton (United Kingdom). He is specialized in the history of race and ethnicity in Britain and the United States. His first book, Fight Against Fear, focused on the reaction of the small Jewish minority in the American South to the black civil rights struggle. A second book, Rabble Rousers, looked at white extremists who used violence to resist civil rights reform. Most recently, he co-wrote with William Carrigan of Rowan University in New Jersey Forgotten Dead, a book that assesses mob violence against Mexicans in the United States. His current research focuses on the historical relationship between Britain and the United States including such issues as race, politics and culture. For more details see http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/109349.

Program

  • 9:00
    Welcome
  • 9:15
    Screening documentary (TBA)
  • 11:00
    Creative writing exercises
  • 12:00
    Lunch break (at own expense / bring-your-own)
  • 13:00
    Presentations by contributors, followed by discussion and feedback from Clive Webb
  • 14:30
    Short break
  • 14:45
    Presentations + discussion (part 2)
  • 16:15
    Coffee & tea break
  • 16:30
    VU Graduate School Guest lecture with Clive Webb: ‘The Holocaust and The African-American Freedom Struggle’
  • 17:30
    Drinks

Preparation

All participants are asked to write an essay (max. 2 pages) on their own research, connecting their research with the proposed readings. In addition, they should also prepare a short presentation. Non-participants should read the supporting texts in advance and prepare comments or questions arising from the readings. Participants who want to receive 1 ECTS are expected to complete the following assignments. Please send the essay and PowerPoint presentation to the organizers one week before the workshop.

1: Writing exercise (all participants)

Please bring pen and paper (preferably) – or a laptop. Through creative writing exercises all participants and attendants will practice their writing skills. This is a perfect exercise if you need to overcome your writer’s block.

2: Essay (only for participants wanting to receive credits)

Describe in an essay of approximately two pages how you use, or could use, intersections in history to reveal hidden, forgotten or marginalized histories. What voices remain unheard in the historical sources that you use for your project? Would a comparative, transnational or postcolonial approach be a valuable addition to your research?

3: PowerPoint presentation (only for participants wanting to receive credits)

Prepare a PowerPoint presentation (4 to 5 minutes) about your essay. This will be followed by 5 minutes for comments and discussion. These presentations are a showcase of your research: there is ample time to discuss your research further during the breaks and drinks afterwards.

Readings

Please read the following articles/chapters (these will be shared with you after signing up):

  • Clive Webb, Fight Against Fear. Southern Jews and Black Civil Rights. University of Georgia Press, 2001. Chapter 4, pages 69-87.
  • Michael Rothberg, Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization. Stanford University Press, 2009. Introduction, pages 1-29.

Credits and certificate

Interested students and researchers can participate in two ways: as an active auditor or as a contributor. Contributors are expected to submit a short paper (max 2 pages, may be sent to Huizinga-fgw@uva.nl one week before the workshop) and give a presentation, which are both required for earning 1 ECTS. These papers, together with the proposed literature from the speakers, will be distributed to all participants in advance, and will be a starting point for the discussion.

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. Event coordinators will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Please direct your request to Huizinga-fgw@uva.nl and include the postal address you want the certificate to be sent to. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS; you need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

Masterclass – Professor Toyin Falola (University of Texas)

The Academy and the Idea of Decolonisation

Date: 10 December 2018
Time: 10:00-12:30 (masterclass) & 14:00-17:00 (keynote lecture and discussion)
Venue: Amsterdam, Bushuis (VOC-zaal) & University Library (Doelenzaal)
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students
Credits: 1 ECTS (for PhD and RMa students only)
Coordination: Larissa Schulte Nordholt (Leiden University) and Marleen Reichgelt (Radboud University Nijmegen)
Maximum participants in this event: 20
Registration (before 1 November 2018)

It has been argued that the academic system of knowledge production—as we have known it since the Age of Imperialism/the Enlightenment—is fundamentally Western, wherein the west assumes the status of the “universal”. Although many former colonies around the world (Asia, Africa and Latin America) received political freedom in the second half of the twentieth century, the dominant mode of knowledge production and critical thinking within the academy was, and  still is, largely determined by a western white male perception. Although universities worldwide are able to flourish to some extent, it remains difficult to truly escape from a normative western hegemony on the system of knowledge production and academic research.

The dominance of these thought-patterns originating in the west was never completely unchallenged and gained momentum from the second half of the twentieth century onwards through anticolonial and postcolonial critique, feminist discourse and the emergence of global intellectual history. The new tide of such critical thinking questioned Eurocentric approaches in history, philosophy and anthropology, among others, and argued in favour of a decolonisation of (academic) knowledge production. As a result the humanities have been enriched by crucial debates regarding the place of ‘Europe’ within Academic research as a whole.

To apply the insights from these debates to one’s research, however, can be a challenging feat – both on a theoretical and a practical level. This masterclass aims to revisit the state of the art on theories of decolonisation of academic research. Junior researchers will be given the chance to engage with questions concerning mental decolonization as they pertain to their own research projects. The goal is to inform students and researchers of cultural history about ongoing debates on Decolonisation and knowledge production from a global intellectual perspective.

Toyin Falola

Prof. Falola (1953) is a Nigerian historian of Africa who currently holds the Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair Professor in the Humanities and a Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Falola, who took his PhD-degree at the university of Ile-Ife in Nigeria, is a prolific scholar on African history from the 19th century onwards. He has written both local histories, focusing on Yoruba history in Nigeria, and more globally oriented accounts on the histories of Africa as a whole. Moreover, he has taught and written extensively on African intellectual history and the emergence of the field of African and Black studies, focusing on its pedagogies, methodologies and epistemologies.

Literature and preparation

A list of required readings and information about the assignment will be sent to the admitted participants in the course of November.

Cursus Cultuurhistorisch Onderzoek (CCO) | Research into Cultural History Course 2019

Dates: 28 and 29 January, 20 February, 6 and 20 March, 3 and 17 April, 29 May from 10:00h to 16:30h
Venues: 28 and 29 January: Utrecht | other dates: Amsterdam
Open to: PhD Candidates who are affiliated with the Huizinga Institute
ECTS: 6
Coordinators: TBA
NB: First-year PhD candidates who are affiliated with the Huizinga Institute will be enrolled in this course automatically.

More information will follow soon

Course Oral History and Life Stories

Dates: 10, 17, 24, 31 January & 7 February 2019
Time: 13:30 – 17:00
Venue: University of Amsterdam, Oudemanhuispoort E 1.07 (10, 17, 24, 31 January) / PC Hoofthuis 6.25 (7 February)
Candidates: PhD candidates and advanced RMa students
Credits: 3 ECTS
Fee: (non-members): € 250
Max. number of participants: 15
Coordinator & lecturer: Professor Selma Leydesdorff and selected guest speakers
Registration: Register and send in your motivation letter before: 20 November 2018

The course

Historians and others who interview about the past often talk about memory and how they are informed by memory, while they know memory is a difficult and problematic source for historical knowledge. During this course we shall concentrate on the use of memory in historical research and look at the kind of knowledge we get when we interview. We will investigate various efforts to create a more systematic and theoretically grounded approach than ‘just talking about days long gone’ or ‘having a chat about the past’. How can we create a research pattern that overcomes the incidental and replace it by an integration of the changing character of spoken narratives about the past? When can we trust a story, why? And if we can not, why can it still be important to listen. And how do we listen?

We shall also compare spoken memories with other ego-documents, bearing in mind the many other existing and valid ways of interviewing about personal experience and analyse when and how we produce alternative and unfamiliar viewpoints. Because historical interviews ask a lot of research time, participants in this course will involve in questions like: Do I really need interviews, what do I want to know, are there other ways to get this kind of knowledge?

General starting-point for discussion is the study of life stories in oral history as a tradition in the humanities and in the social sciences. During the course additional attention will be given to alternative modes of in-depth interviews. Issues to be investigated in particular concern the questions of intersubjectivity; (self) reflection; identification with the Other and her/his past; and the interviewer’s role in the process of meaning/knowledge production. What are our responsibilities towards people we interview, do we have particular responsibilities in our research communities? What does it mean to be close to an interviewee, what happens if there is distance or when we don’t like what we hear? Do we have to agree with our interviewees?

Part of the teaching will be done by looking at oral histories made by oral historians who published their interviews on websites.

Testing and evaluative criteria

Presence during class is obligatory including collaboration on preparing the discussions. Rema students are requested to write a 4 page paper on one subject in the literature or about the integration of the course in their own work. PhD students who need credit points are requested to present a 7 page paper on how they will use the literature.

Preparation, literature and assignments

The literature is composed of various articles, informing on how to organize a larger interview project, or discussing how to analyse interviews. The various stages of larger projects will be followed. The list of literature is updated annually. Guest lecturers are invited to explain how they overcome difficulties during their research, while the course also discusses more theoretical approaches. Since the use of websites for the dissemination of narrated accounts and the making of interviews with the help of a camera has become more and more important we’ll follow up some ethical and practical issues.

As usual advanced researchers who want to refresh their knowledge with recent literature and who want to bring their problems and subjects to the discussion will be welcome. They are asked to accept a status in which they are equal with other participants.

Data

Every meeting the literature will be discussed. The last hour 15.15 till 16.30-45 guestspeakers will tell about their own work and use the literature of that particular session.

10/1: Prof. Selma Leydesdorff and Aysenur Korkmaz MA
Introduction, the many ways to interview, the ways memories are stored in our brain and change, Visual and audio interviews. How to make a video with a historic interview. During the last hour of this session, Aysenur Korkmaz will lecture on how she has set up her research and the difficulties she faced.

17/1: Prof. Selma Leydesdorff and Prof. Nanci Adler
Interviewing traumatized people, what is trauma, distortions after long imprisonment, concentration camps and the Gulag.

24/1: Prof. Selma Leydesdorff and Dr Sanneke Stigter
Working with modern art collections in a museum. What is auto-ethnopgraphy? When the object moves, how important is the interview.

31/1: Prof. Selma Leydesdorff and Dr Marie Louise Janssen
Interviewing in ‘other worlds’, Interviewing about secret knowledge. Interviewing in another culture, Chinese women in massage parlours.

7/2: Prof. Selma Leydesdorff and Prof. Fridus Steijlen
Large collections , how to set up a large project, what are the consequences of digitalization, the Indonesian decolonisation and oral history. How to orden a large collection of different parties and make the interviews available. Fridus Steijlen will speak about his participation in the project ‘Decolonization and Violence and War in Indonesia’where he interviews.

14/2: Extra session if, due to ice or illness, one session is cancelled.

PhD Conference Autumn 2018

Date: October 16 & 17, 2018
Venue: Hoorneboeg, Hilversum (a shuttle bus from and to Hilversum station will be available around 9:30 (16 Ocotber) and 17:00 (17 October))
Open to: PhD candidates, exclusive for Huizinga members
ECTS: 3 (with presentation), 1 (auditor)
Registration

At this conference third-year PhD candidates from all over the country who are member of the Huizinga Institute got the chance to give a presentation on (a part of) their research. Their talks will be discussed by coreferents (who have been invited by the candidates themselves), and the audience. Huizinga staff members and PhD candidates who are in their first, second or fourth year are more than welcome to join this conference.

Masterclass – ‘Do sales matter? Reputation and contemporary popularity in the Early Modern Book World’ with Andrew Pettegree

Amsterdam, Monday 27 August 2018
10:00 – 12:00
KNAW, Trippenhuis, Kloveniersburgwal 29, 1011 JV Amsterdam
1 ECTS upon request
Open to rMA students and PhD candidates

All authors worry about their sales, even if, as in the first age of print, they made hardly any money from their books. In today’s book world, there is no clear relationship between sales and literary reputation; and in an age when the Nobel Prize for Literature may be awarded to a troubadour with no very obvious literary pretensions, even our concept of literature seems increasingly malleable.  In the early modern period also, the relationship between sales and reputation deserves to be probed further, not least for its impact on our understanding of the societies we study. Are the books we choose to study from previous centuries chosen because contemporaries recognised them as important or because they reflect our current preoccupations?  And how can we know which books past societies particularly valued?  These troubling questions – troubling not least because they are so routinely ignored – are the subject of this workshop.

Andrew Pettegree

Andrew Pettegree is Professor Modern History at the University of St Andrews (United Kingdom).

Preparatory Reading

  • Owen Gingerich, The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus (London: Penguin, 2005).
  • Andrew Pettegree en Arthur der Weduwen, What was published in the seventeenth-century Dutch Republic?, Livre. Revue Historique (2018).
  • Flavia Bruni en Andrew Pettegree, Lost Books. Reconstructing the Print World of Pre-Industrial Europe (Leiden: Brill, 2016).

Please also read and prepare the following discussion document:

  • Catalogus variorum & insignum librorum incompactorum (Amsterdam: Abraham and Petrus van Someren, 1685). (Available from Book Sales Catalogues Online).

NB: Participants will receive an email with information about how to get hold of these readings a few weeks before the masterclass.

Registration

Please register before 20 August 2018 by sending an email to huizinga-fgw@uva.nl.

Masterclass – ‘Interpreting Early Modern Portraits’ with Prof. Harry Berger – CANCELED

NB: Due to circumstances this event has been canceled

Date: 8 May 2018
Time: 12.00-14.00
Venue: Bushuis, room E1.14C (Kloveniersburgwal 48 Amsterdam)
Open to: Research master students and PhD candidates
Credits: 1 ECTS
Registration: send an email to Ben Moore, University of Amsterdam (B.P.Moore@uva.nl). Readings will be provided to registered attendees.

Description

How do we define portraits and distinguish them from other genres? In this session, Harry Berger will discuss nine ‘portrait premises’ that help us identify the specific characteristics of the images we call portraits. There will be a particular focus on early modern painting, including Rembrandt’s self-portraits. The masterclass is based on research from Prof Berger’s forthcoming book Canon Fodder: New Studies in European Poetry, Fiction, Drama, and Painting and is followed at 15.30 by a lecture on Rembrandt and Shakespeare (held in the VOC-zaal), in collaboration with the Amsterdam Centre for the Study of the Golden Age.

Graduate students and PhDs attending the masterclass should read the supporting texts in advance and prepare comments or questions arising from their readings.

Guest speaker details

Harry Berger is Professor Emeritus of Literature and Art History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His work on Renaissance and Baroque literature and art history is extensive and wide ranging, covering topics such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Marvell, Dutch still-life painting, Plato, and critical theory. Among his most recent books are Harrying: Skills of Offense in Shakespeare’s Henriad (2015), The Perils of Uglytown:  Structural Misanthropology in Plato’s Republic (2015) and Caterpillage: Reflections on 17th Century Dutch Still Life Painting (2011). For more details see http://havc.ucsc.edu/faculty/harry-berger.

 

 

 

Masterclass by Davide Rodogno (The Graduate Institute, Geneva)

Date: 22 March 2018
Time: 14.00-16.30
Venue: Leiden University, Lipsius building, room 147
Open to: Researchmaster- and PhD-students
Fee: free
Credits: 1 ECTS (available upon request)
Registration: Maximum participants in this event: 25 Register before: March 8, 2018
Register here: rethinkingdisability@hum.leidenuniv.nl (See also below)

This masterclass is part of the two-day workshop ‘Historians without Borders: Writing Histories of International Organizations’. This workshop is organized by the ERC project ‘Rethinking Disability’ and sponsored by the Huizinga Institute. It is intended to bring together early-career researchers from different fields working on international organizations, to discuss methodological challenges together with peers and established scholars and aims at providing an informal and interactive setting for the exchange of ideas and perspectives.

Ever since historians have started to break with their ‘methodological nationalism’, history beyond borders has seem to split up in different subfields – e.g. global, transnational and world history – where fruitful dialogue sometimes seems increasingly difficult. The purpose of this workshop is to open up this dialogue, to see what specific advantages different approaches can offer and how they can be best put to use. In order to do this, the workshop will focus on the history of international organizations, from the main intergovernmental organizations (IOs) – such as the League of Nations, the UN or the NATO – to the vast field of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs), spanning a diverse range of causes from the environment (Greenpeace), over human rights (Amnesty International), to humanitarianism (Médecins sans frontières).

More information and an overview of the complete program for the workshop can be found here.

Possible approaches to the history of international organizations: chances and limitations of a view from Geneva

The masterclass will be divided in three parts of roughly fifty minutes each. In the first part we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of studying the history and politics of international organizations using primary sources produced by international organizations. In the second part we will consider different approaches useful to study the history of international organizations; we will also engage with the usefulness of labels and ‘turns’ in contemporary history. In the third and final part of this class we will take cue from my research on the history of Western humanitarianism to debate approaches, sources, methods and methodologies as well as the risks related to the setting up of a research field.

The masterclass will be taught by Davide Rodogno. Dr. Rodogno was a Research Fellow at the London School of Economics (2002-2004), Foreign Associate Researcher at the Institut d’Histoire du Temps Présent in Paris (2004-2005), Academic Fellow – Research Council United Kingdom Academic Fellow – at the School of History, University of St Andrews (2005-2010), and SNSF – Research Professor (2008-2011). Associate professor (2011-2014) and full professor since 2014 at the Graduate Institute, he serves as head of the International History Department (2014-2017). He researches the history of philanthropic foundations, and international public health since the nineteenth century. In 2011 Rodogno published Against Massacre: Humanitarian Interventions in the Ottoman Empire (1815-1914), the Birth of a Concept and International Practice (Princeton University Press). During the summer of 2012 the Kofi Annan Foundation mandated Rodogno to write a report documenting the experience of the United Nations and League of Arab States Joint Special Envoy for Syria. More recently, Rodogno co-edited and authored a volume on the history of Humanitarian Photography, a volume on Transnational Networks of Experts in the Long Nineteenth century, and another on the League of Nations’ social work. He currently works on a third monograph tentatively entitled: Night on Earth – Humanitarian Organizations’ Relief and Rehabilitation Programmes on Behalf of Civilian Populations (1918-1939).

Preparation and proposed readings

Students will be asked to read a selection of articles in preparation for the masterclass.

Registration

In order to register for the masterclass, please send an email to rethinkingdisability@hum.leidenuniv.nl. In your email, kindly state:

  • Your name
  • Your affiliation
  • How your research is linked to the methodological issues discussed in the masterclass

Masterclass dr Nigel Hamilton (University of Massachusetts)

Date: 19 September 2018
Time: 12.30-15.00
Venue: to be announced
Open to: Researchmaster- and PhD-students
Fee (non-members): €50
Credits: 1 ECTS (available upon request)
Registration: Maximum participants in this event: 20 Register before: June 1, 2018
Register here: bioconferencegroningen@rug.nl

Biographical research as a corrective to historiography

On September 19, 2018, dr Nigel Hamilton, author of award-winning biographies of Fieldmarshall Montgomery, F.D. Roosevelt and J.F. Kennedy, will host a masterclass on his best practices as a biographer. This masterclass will take place during the conference Different Lives. Global Perspectives on Biography in Public Cultures and Societies (September 19-21, 2018). It will give Researchmaster- and PhD-students the opportunity to discuss the way biographical research can correct existing historiography. How can ‘agency’ be used as a hermeneutic device to compare the way different individuals acted during a certain time and place? By reading different samples from dr. Hamiltons biographies, students will investigate the structural incoherence between the agency of an individual, and the mentality of the time in which he or she was living. What makes historical practice comprehendible, if it is not related to some larger structure or development? Students will delve into the debate on what did biographers do to contribute to methodology of Microhistory, in which developments on a small scale can be an analytical framework for a more complex historical phenomenon.

Preparation and proposed readings

  • a selection of fragments of mr. Hamiltons biographies will be provided for the participating students in order to prepare the masterclass
  • students are required to prepare a short presentation (5 minutes) of the way a biographical approach to cultural history is incorporated in their research. Submit to bioconferenceboard@rug.nl; deadline: June 1, 2018

Credits & certificate

Certificates of participation and credits are available upon request after the event. Event coordinators will decide whether the participant has fulfilled all requirements for the ECTS. Please direct your request to Huizinga-fgw@uva.nl and include the postal address you want the certificate to be sent to. Note: the certificate itself is not valid as ECTS, you need to validate it yourself at your local Graduate School.

If you require assistance in booking your hotel or arranging your travels, you can reach the board in Groningen at bioconferenceboard@rug.nl. You can buy early bird tickets until June 1 for 40 euros, or full-priced tickets for 60 euros afterwards. If you would like to join the conference dinner, you can reserve a place while booking for 50 euros. We will send out more information on booking as soon as possible.

Make sure to follow our event on Facebook: Different Lives Conference, https://www.facebook.com/events/1837816226288808/.

 

 

Rome lezen: de toeristische stad

Masterclass Prof. James A. Parente, Jr. (Minnesota)

Transnational Literary History in a Multilingual Age

Date: 13 February 2018
Time: 11-14.30hr
Venue: Amsterdam, Het Universiteitstheater, Nieuwe Doelenstraat 16 – zaal 1.01A
Open to: scholars, PhD students, (R)MA students, scholars
Credits: 1 ECTS (for PhD and RMa students only)
Coordination: Prof. Lia van Gemert
Registration:
Maximum participants in this event: 25
Register: Send an e-mail to: goudeneeuw-fgw@uva.nl
Register before: 5 February 2018

In this masterclass Prof. Parente will speak about Transnational Literary History in a Multilingual Age. After general discussion and a lunch break participants can discuss their own themes with professor Parente. The session after lunch will also be open for participants who have not sent in questions.

Literary history once again appears en vogue. With increasing frequency, there have been “new” histories of French (1989; 2010), German (2005), American (2009), and modern Chinese literature (2017), an “atlas” (atlante) of Italian literature (2010-2012), a spatial literary history of Denmark (2010), a new literary history of Al-Andalus (2000), and three separate encyclopedias of Neo-Latin writing (2013, 2015, 2017). A new paradigm for writing European literary history has also been exemplified by David Wallace (2016). Most notably, the final installment of the 10-volume, 8,000-page history of Dutch literature (GNL)was completed in late 2016. The Master Class will explore this renewed interest in literary history, the ways in which the traditional narratives of literary history have been questioned, discarded, or revised, and the recent challenges to writing literary history in the age of global connectivity. We will question the function of literary history, discuss its continued utility, and explore alternatives for writing history for the early modern period in which national and linguistic boundaries were still in flux. Special attention will be paid to the construction of transnational and multilingual narratives for the Low Countries.

James A. Parente, Jr. (Ph.D., Germanic Languages and Literatures, Yale University) is a Professor of German, Scandinavian and Dutch literature at the University of Minnesota and Director of the Minnesota Center for German and European Studies. He is a specialist in early modern (1400-1750) German, Dutch, and Nordic literatures and cultures, and early modern Neo-Latin literature. He is the author of Religious Drama and the Humanist Tradition: Christian Theater in Germany and the Netherlands, 1500-1680, and has edited/ co-edited two anthologies of critical work on the early modern Holy Roman Empire, and another on modern Scandinavian literature. He has published widely on early modern German, Dutch and Neo-Latin literature, especially drama; Renaissance humanism; gender and sexuality in the German Empire; the Dutch Golden Age; early modern Danish literature, and Henrik Ibsen. He is currently working on translational literary relations between the German Empire, the Netherlands, and Nordic Europe, and on the historiography of Europe in the early modern period.

co-organizers and related events:

  • co-organizers; ACSGA (Van Gemert)
  • related event: Golden Age Seminar, 13 February 2018 by prof. James Parente, Jr., 15.30-17.00, VOC-zaal Bushuis, Kloveniersburgwal 48, 1012 CX Amsterdam. The title of this lecture is: Border Crossings and the Emergence of Dutch Literature. See http://acsga.uva.nl/ .

Programme:

day planning (incl. coffee and tea, and lunch breaks)

  • 11:00 Room open, coffee and tea
  • 11.15-12:30 Lecture with general discussion
  • 12:30-13:15 Lunch in Museumcafé (Oude Turfmarkt 129): participants take care and pay for their own lunch
  • 13:15-14:00 Discussion on themes that the participants have sent in or bring up during the masterclass

Preparation and proposed readings and assigment:

  1. Participation in first and second part of the masterclass (so before and after lunch)
  2. A clear description of the questions you have for prof. Parente, linked to a clear description of your research theme and the steps you have already taken or would consider to take. The maximum number of questions is 3. Questions must be sent in before 5 February (to e.m.p.vangemert@uva.nl and cc to goudeneeuw-fgw@uva.nl.
  3. The Golden Age seminar in the afternoon is not obligatory for obtaining the 1 EC credit.

Reading for preparation (pdf’s will be sent after we have received your registration at the registration address):

  • Bloemendal, Jan. “Introduction: Bilingualism, Multilingualism and the Formation of Europe.” In Bilingual Europe: Latin and Vernacular Cultures, Examples of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, c. 1300-1800. Ed. Jan Bloemendal. Leiden: Brill, 2015. Pp. 1-14.
  • Deneire, Tom. “Neo-Latin Literature and the Vernacular.” In A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature. Ed. Victoria Moul. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Pp. 35-51.
  • Gelderblom, Arie Jan and Anne Marie Musschoot. Ongeziene blikken: Nabeschouwing bij de “Geschiedenis van de Nederlandse literatuur.” Amsterdam: Bert Bakker, 2017. Pp. 7-38.
  • Schenkeveld-van der Dussen, M. A., ed. Nederlandse literatuur, een geschiedenis. Groningen: Nijhoff, 1993. “Woord vooraf,” pp. v-viii.
  • Wallace, David. “Table of Contents” and “General Introduction”, in: Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418. Vol. 1. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. viii-xiii + [table “” not found /]
    .

After general discussion and a lunch break participants can discuss their own themes with professor Parente.

Please sent your questions by 5 February to Prof Lia van Gemert e.m.p.vangemert@uva.nl and cc to goudeneeuw-fgw@uva.nl.